Skip to content
Models

Audi e-tron

The Audi e-tron is the first full-electrical model from the brand with the four rings. The sporty SUV combines the space and comfort of a typical luxury class automobile with a range suitable for everyday use, catapulting the driver into a new era with the electrical all-wheel drive. Forward-looking, innovative, and electric – the next step into the future.

Press folders

  • 12/21/21
    Models

    E-mobility during winter season

    Electrically powered cars not only need to heat the interior in winter, but also to keep the battery system at the right temperature. This is because low outside temperatures have a negative effect on the performance of high-voltage batteries. Audi experts Pierre Woltmann and Thomas Anzenberger explain in an interview why concerns about excessive range loss in electrically powered Audi models are unfounded. Also: Eight tips on what Audi customers can do to keep the high-voltage battery of their e-tron model efficient in winter.
  • 06/05/20
    Technology

    Audi TechTalk Charging

    In the Audi TechTalk, we’re presenting complex and innovative technology topics – at regular intervals and in multimedia form – addressed directly by our experts. Relevant background information and video compilations of all Audi TechTalk issues can be found here.

Basic Information

  • 09/10/20
    Models

    Dynamic, fast, and electric: The Audi e-tron S and the Audi e-tron S Sportback

    Audi is launching its first two fully electric S models – the Audi e-tron S and the Audi e-tron S Sportback. Their three electric motors, two of which are located on the rear axle, together provide 370 kW of boost power and 973 Nm (717.6 lb-ft) of torque, Vehicle safety and vehicle dynamics in particular have reached a new level: In addition to the electric all-wheel drive, the cars are equipped with electric torque vectoring, which provides active and fully variable torque distribution on the rear axle.

Press Releases

  • 01/12/22
    Company

    Second life for EV batteries: Audi and RWE build new type of energy storage system in Herdecke

    Audi and RWE are breaking new ground together to drive the energy revolution forward – RWE has brought an energy storage facility on stream in Herdecke, Germany, that uses used lithium-ion batteries from Audi electric cars. With the help of 60 battery systems, the new type of storage facility on the site of RWE’s pumped-storage power plant on Lake Hengstey will be able to temporarily store around 4.5 megawatt hours of electricity.
  • 12/17/21
    Technology

    Electromobility in winter: Intelligent functions optimize range and charging performance

    Seat heating instead of a hot air blower, optimum tire pressure, parking in the garage, and selecting the efficiency mode: these and other factors determine how quickly the high-voltage battery is drained – or not. What can Audi customers do beyond the established tips to keep the high-voltage battery in their e-tron model working efficiently during the winter and to achieve optimal range?
  • 12/15/21
    Technology

    Electromobility in winter: Intelligent thermal management in Audi models preserves range and performance

    In the winter, electrically powered cars have to bring the interior and the battery system to the right temperature. This double task already requires a lot of energy from them. Low exterior temperatures exacerbate the problem – and affect high-voltage batteries’ performance. Nonetheless, concern over excessive loss of range in electric Audi models is unfounded: with intelligent thermal management, the brand provides outstanding performance and range in its cars; special protective mechanisms ensure long battery life. In an interview, Pierre Woltmann, head of thermal management for high-voltage batteries at Audi, and Thomas Anzenberger from thermal management virtual functional development explain how the company with the four rings is effectively meeting the challenges of winter operation.

More Content

Audi e-tron

Audi e-tron Sportback

Audi e-tron prototype

Back to top